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1816 July Lady Reading A Book Wearing A White Morning Dress and Cap. #Regency #JaneAusten #Fashion

January 27, 2022

1816  July  White Morning Dress, English. Lady reading a book and wearing a high-waisted, relaxed Empire style white muslin dress with a lace hem and a matching white morning cap. Described as a round dress of jaconet muslin, finished around the skirt with a deep flounce of rich work scolloped at the edge. Dress has a slight fullness in the back and the front is extremely novel and pretty. Plain long sleeve, finished at the wrist by a pink band and bow. The cornette, or mob cap, is composed of white lace, and tastefully ornamented with roses. Pink kid slippers, and white kid gloves. “This dress is much approved by belles of taste for it elegant simplicity: its form and materials are certainly strictly appropriate to morning costume. It is invented by Mrs. Gill, of Cork-street, Burlington-Gardens, to whom we are indebted for it.”Fashion Plate via Rudolph Ackermann’s ‘The Repository of Arts’. 

1816 July White Morning Dress, English. Lady reading a book and wearing a high-waisted, relaxed Empire style white muslin dress with a lace hem and a matching white morning cap. Described as a round dress of jaconet muslin, finished around the skirt with a deep flounce of rich work scalloped at the edge. Dress has a slight fullness in the back and the front is extremely novel and pretty. Plain long sleeve, finished at the wrist by a pink band and bow. The cornette, or mob cap, is composed of white lace, and tastefully ornamented with roses. Pink kid slippers, and white kid gloves. Fashion Plate via Rudolph Ackermann's 'The Repository of Arts'.
1816 July Lady reading a book and wearing a high-waisted, relaxed Empire style white muslin dress with a lace hem and a matching white morning cap. Fashion Plate via Rudolph Ackermann’s ‘The Repository of Arts’.

Typical outfit worn for mornings at home during the early 1800s and to only be worn in the company of family or close friends. Jane Austen her female relatives would have worn this type of outfit while having breakfast, writing letters, practicing her music or painting or while reading. Called by the various names of Undress, to At-Home dress, or Morning dress, it is the most relaxed ensemble a lady will wear all day and yet it is always worn with a cap, as etiquette dictates that hair must be covered at all times. Gloves are also normally worn with this outfit, unless bare hands are essential. 

1816 July Lady Reading A Book Wearing A White Morning Dress and Cap. #Regency #JaneAusten #Fashion https://books2read.com/SuziLoveFashionWomen1815-1819

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1811 Woman Carrying Cloth and a Package. Sewing a dress? #JaneAusten #Regency #Fashion #Sewing

January 27, 2022

1811 Woman Carrying Cloth and a Package. Sewing a dress? Dress with a white bodice, green spotted cornet for a hat. Fashion Plate via Journal des Dames et des Modes, or Costume Parisien. Even though this a French fashion plate, this is typical of the Empire dresses worn by Jane Austen and her contemporaries. Low necklines and skirts that started directly under the bust and flowed into the classical relaxed wide styles of Greece and Rome. These high-waisted dresses were worn most days and cotton, silk or taffeta were the popular fabrics.

1811 Woman Carrying Cloth and a Package. Sewing a dress? Dress with a white bodice, green spotted cornet for a hat. Fashion Plate via Suzi Love suzilove.com & Journal des Dames et des Modes, or Costume Parisien.
1811 Woman Carrying Cloth and a Package. Sewing a dress? Dress with a white bodice, green spotted cornet for a hat. Fashion Plate via Journal des Dames et des Modes, or Costume Parisien.

1811 Woman Carrying Cloth and a Package. Sewing a dress? #JaneAusten #Regency #Fashion #Sewing https://books2read.com/SuziLoveFashion1810-1814

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19th Century Early Silk and Glass Reticule, Or Bag, As Carried In Jane Austen’s Times. #JaneAusten #Regency #Reticule

January 26, 2022

19th cent. Early. Reticule, or Bag, of silk, metal and glass, French, as carried in Jane Austen’s times. Silk ribbon work, with rosy glass beads, and silver purl flowers and backgrounding to the wreath motif. via Metropolitan Museum, N.Y.C., U.S.A. metmuseum.org

Definition Reticule: Bag or purse, often with a drawstring to pull closed and usually made of cloth or covered cardboard and often decorated with beading or embroidery. A reticule, or purse, or handbag, was usually carried by a woman during the Regency period to carry all their daily necessities. Earlier, women used pockets that tied at the waistline and were hidden in the folds of their skirts. Empire style, or early 1800s, high-waisted dresses made it impossible to either sewn in a pocket or to tie on a pocket. So women began carrying small, decorated bags called Reticules, or ridicules, which generally pulled close at the top with a drawstring.

19th cent. Early. Reticule. Silk, metal and glass. French. Silk ribbon work, with rosy glass beads, and silver purl flowers and backgrounding to the wreath motif. metmuseum.org
19th Century. Early. Reticule. Silk, metal and glass. French. Silk ribbon work, with rosy glass beads, and silver purl flowers and backgrounding to the wreath motif. via Metropolitan Museum New York City, U.S.A. metmuseum.org

19th Century Early Silk and Glass Reticule, Or Bag, As Carried In Jane Austen’s Times. #JaneAusten #Regency #Reticule http://books2read.com/suziloveReticules

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Road Travel In Jane Austen’s Times and Beyond. #Regency #JaneAusten BritishHistory #Travel

January 25, 2022

For many centuries, road travel was the main way of getting from place to place, but roads were notoriously rutted and badly maintained, especially in Britain.  The Romans laid down the roads but they very poorly maintained through the 17th and 18th Centuries. It wasn’t until the 19th Century that improvements were made and rose travel opened up.

Roman Road Construction. Roman roads were constructed in layers. Rubble, slabs of stone, pebbles and gravel, smooth paving stones. Average width of road was 15 to 18 feet.

Roman Road Construction. Roman roads were constructed in layers. Rubble, slabs of stone, pebbles and gravel, smooth paving stones. Average width of road was 15 to 18 feet.
Roman Road Construction. Roman roads were constructed in layers. Rubble, slabs of stone, pebbles and gravel, smooth paving stones. Average width of road was 15 to 18 feet.

The dreadful condition of British roads caused great apprehension to all classes of travelers. Making a journey anywhere in the country was a big undertaking and often a gentleman composed his last will and testament before his departure.  Traveling in vehicles was only possible during the day or on the nights with very bright moonlight with few vehicles attempting road travel in winter and any travel on a Sunday was frowned upon. 

From: 1815 Journal of Tour of Great Britain by a French Tourist via Google Books (PD-180) ‘The roads very narrow, crooked, and dirty, continually up  and down. The  horses  we  get  are by  no  means  good,  and  draw  us  with  difficulty at the rate of five miles an  hour. We change carriages as well as horses  at every post house. They are on four wheels,  light and easy, and large  enough for  three  persons. The post boy sits on a cross bar of  wood between the front springs, or rather rests against  it.  This  is  safer,  and  more  convenient both for men and horse, but does not look well and, as far as we have seen,  English post horses and postillions do not  seem to deserve  their reputation.’ 

If you’ve read Jane Austen you’ll know that it was improper for a woman to travel alone, which meant that well-bred women were dependent on male relations to accompany them or else they had to take a maid in the carriage with her and be accompanied by a driver and footmen, which of course added to the cost of carriage travel. Any woman traveling by herself on a mail coach would be subject to speculation and probably malicious gossip.   

Mail coaches raced across these roads trying to stick to a time table but there were numerous accidents on roads that were often flooded, covered in snow, or up such steep hills that passengers had to alight and either push the coach or walk ups the hill. 

1790 Turnpike Gates In The Vicinity Of London, U.K.

1790 Turnpike Gates In The Vicinity Of London, U.K.
1790 Turnpike Gates In The Vicinity Of London, U.K.

1790 Turnpike Gates In The Vicinity Of London, U.K.

Tolls were collected on many roads in Britain but, because the turnpikes were mainly on land belonging to the nobility, money collected went into their personal coffers and very little went to road maintenance. This caused a continual push in parliament to make those who owned the land and collected the money responsible for repairing their roads, but these pleas fell on deaf ears as the lords in who sat in parliament had no interest in spending money to better travel for the common people. 

Description of Stage Coach Travel in England. via  1815  Journal Tour of Great Britain.  

“The gentlemen-coachmen, with half-a dozen great coats about them,—immense capes,—a large nosegay at the button-hole,—high mounted on an elevated seat,—with squared elbows,—a prodigious whip,  beautiful horses, four in hand, drive in a file to Salthill, a place about twenty miles from London, and return, stopping in the way at the several public-houses and gin-shops where stage-coachmen are in the habit of stopping for a dram, and for parcels and passengers on the top of the others as many as seventeen persons. These carriages are not suspended, but rest on steel springs, of a flattened oval shape, less easy than the old mode of leathern braces on springs. Some of these stage coaches carry their baggage below the level of the axletree.” 

1825 Observations on the Management of Turnpikes by John Loudon Mc Adam   Via Google Books (PD-150)

1825 Observations on the Management of Turnpikes by John Loudon Mc Adam. Via Google Books (PD-150)
1825 Observations on the Management of Turnpikes by John Loudon Mc Adam. Via Google Books (PD-150)

1825 Observations on the Management of Turnpikes by John Loudon Mc Adam.  Via Google Books (PD-150)

John Loudon McAdam, born Ayr, Scotland. (1756 -1836)  He acted as a magistrate and assumed other civic roles including one as as trustee of the Ayrshire Turnpike in 1783, where he developed an interest in road construction and engineering, eventually becoming general surveyor for the Bristol Corporation in 1804. He wrote papers on the benefits of raising roads, making them from layers of stone and gravel, and giving priority to drainage. However, no roads were made this way until McAdam was put in charge of remaking the Bristol Turnpike in 1816, when he put his theories into practice and demonstrated macadamization, known as macadam. He made him numerous enemies on the Turnpike Trusts, who preferred to keep the money made from tolls rather than ploughing it back into road improvements but Macadam was soon in widespread use.

John Loudon McAdam (1756 – 1836), Scottish engineer and road-builder who started a new way of raising roads called ‘macadamization’. Via Wikimedia Commons.  

John Loudon McAdam (1756 - 1836), Scottish engineer and road-builder who started a new way of raising roads called 'macadamization'. Via Wikimedia Commons.
John Loudon McAdam (1756 – 1836), Scottish engineer and road-builder who started a new way of raising roads called ‘macadamization’. Via Wikimedia Commons.

1825  John McAdam Observation of English Roads.  “In a Country like England, inhabited by an ‘ intelligent people, well educated, active, and enterprising, where every hint at improvement is eagerly caught at and prosecuted with spirit, it is only possible to account for the apathy respecting Roads, and the want of exertion in prosecuting the means given for improvement, by showing that a strong counteracting principle exists in the defects of the Road Laws, and that although much want of encouragement has arisen from the prejudices of old practitioners— the great obstacle to success remains in the zealous opposition of those who profit by mismanagement in various ways.”  

  McAdam Report on Bristol District Roads, March, 1815.  

  •       Expenditure and Debt. 
  • • 1802 – 1812 only two roads maintained themselves. 
  • • Neither able to pay £100 of the debt they owed.  
  • • No other roads supported themselves at all. 
  • McAdam’s List of Reasons for Bad Roads. 
  • • Ignorance and incapacity of Surveyors
  • • Lack of any control over the lavish spending of Road Trusts
  • • Trust accounts being in an inexplicable mess
  • • No system or scientific mode of constructing roads
  • • Every part of a road being differently formed
  • • Each road managed by a different person
  • • Each area managed by a different Turnpike Trust
  • • Winford Road Trust produced no account books 

McAdam informed the Road Trusts that smooth roads were the most useful and lasted longer because carriages do little damage to a smooth road because the horses exert themselves less and the carriages do not rock and roll.  

Unfortunately for travelers in the late 1700s and early 1800s, the smoothness of a road surface depended on the preparation and distribution of the road building materials used and was therefore entirely in the hands of each individual road-maker. In 1816, Mc Adam reported to the Bristol District the difference in revenue if roads were built of good material, regularly maintained, and if the finances of Turnpike Trusts were under someone’s control.  

1823 ‘Construction of a Macadam Road’ by Carl Rakeman. Via Wikimedia Commons.   

1823 'Construction of a Macadam Road' by Carl Rakeman. Via Wikimedia Commons.
1823 ‘Construction of a Macadam Road’ by Carl Rakeman. Via Wikimedia Commons.

Travel on these roads was also dangerous as highwaymen stopped and robbed anyone who came along. Male or female made no difference to highwaymen in Britain, nor to the bushrangers in Australia or the gangs on American roads, as they robbed indiscriminately and often with violence.   

By the end of the 18th Century, however, travel as a pleasurable pursuit came into vogue and numerous guides were written for traveling all over the British Isles as well as on the continent. 

The 1812  ‘Tour Of Dr. Syntax’ was an ironic look at the new obsession of travel and travel guides. Before he set off for the Lake District, Dr. Syntax said to his wife, “You well know what my pen can do, and I’ll employ my pencil too: I’ll ride and write, and sketch and print and thus create a real mint: I’ll prose it here, I’ll verse it there and picturesque it everywhere. I’ll do what all have done before; I think I shall and somewhat more.” 

 Georgian and Regency travelers were envious of aristocrats, even if they were of the nobility themselves, and loved to view all the British Great Houses. 

A gentleman and his wife would even drive up to the front door of a mansion house and demand to be given a tour of the house.  If they weren’t admitted, they would write in their journals of the inhospitable nature of the people on a particular estate. Thomas Pennant, William Mavor, and others, loved to write about these bad experiences and have them published.  Paterson’s British Itinerary, a travel guide had 17 editions between 1785-1832 – it outlined the roads used by the stage and mail coaches, the tolls, the bridges, etc.   

This new touring craze created an industry of hospitality that encompassed more than simple mail coach trips from place to place, and more than a noble family traveling from their country seat to the Metropolis of London for parliamentary sittings. Inns had to improve the quality of the linens and meals if they wanted to attract the wealthier traveling class. Before that, many travelers carried their own linen, crockery, glasses, and utensils, as they didn’t trust the hygiene or standards of country inns.  

Travel became something written about by poets with many sonnets written to the beauty of places like the Lake District in England, or the pyramids in Egypt. Inns became cleaner and more respectable so they could welcome travelers of the upper classes. This also meant that women could travel more as roads were slowly improved from rutted tracks that were only suitable for horse riding to roads that family coaches could travel along, though these roads were still narrow and subject to extremes of weather, such as flooding.  The race was on to travel from places like London to Edinburgh in the fastest possible time. 

1817-1875 ca. Vehicles. From: Pierre Larousse’s World Dictionary Of the 19th Century. 

1817-1875 ca. Vehicles. From: Pierre Larousse's World Dictionary Of the 19th Century.https://suzilove.wordpress.com/wp-admin/books2read.com/SuziLoveTravel
1817-1875 ca. Vehicles. From: Pierre Larousse’s World Dictionary Of the 19th Century.

1920-1922 ca.  Automobiles.

1920-1922 ca. Automobiles.
1920-1922 ca. Automobiles.

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1770-1790 ca. Child’s Linen Stays, American. #GeorgianEra #Corset #America

January 25, 2022

1770-1790 ca. Child’s Stays, American. Linen plain weave, baleen, or whalebone, silk braided tape. Dimensions: Center Front Length: 5 3/4 inches (14.6 cm) Waist: 18 inches (45.7 cm). Made in United States of America. This pair of stays is only eighteen inches around, and might have been worn by a small child of eighteen months to two years old. Putting stays on young girls and boys was not seen as harsh, but rather as insurance that their figures would develop the correct form, with chest out and shoulders down. While boys usually wore stays only in early childhood, they were considered essential for females throughout their lives. via Philadelphia Museum of Art philamuseum.org Accession Number: 1988-15-1 Credit Line: Purchased with the Bloomfield Moore Fund, 1988

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1818 December Morning and Evening Dresses, Possibly For Mourning. #Regency #Fashion #Mourning

January 25, 2022

1818 December Morning and Evening Dresses, possibly for mourning as Princess Charlotte died in 1817. Published by Dean and Munday, Threadneedle Street, London, U.K.

Walking Dress is a plain high dress of black bombazine with long sleeves. Skirt trimmed on hem with a broad bias piece of black crape with narrow puffing of black crape. Sleeve hem has three narrow puffings of black crape. Fastens in front and ornamented on the  bust with black crape, no collar but a very full mourning ruff of clear muslin. Over this dress is a Spanish coat of fine black Merino, cut tight to the body, short in the waist and trimmed with a row of black buttons on each side of the bust. Black velvet collar is finished round the edge with black crape, long sleeves of an easy fullness and trimmed at the wrist the same as the collar. Very tasteful epaulette is a mixture of black velvet and crape. Skirt is slightly full, trimmed up the fronts and round the hem with a broad band of black velvet, edged on each side by narrow rouleaux of black crape.

Dinner Dress is of black crape over a black sarsnet slip with a gored skirt, trimmed on the hem with black crape flounces, lower very narrow and higher considerably broader and surmounted by another narrow one. They are scalloped and finished at the edge by black satin, narrow rouleau of the same material heads top and bottom flounce. Corsage of black satin cut very low round the bust and waist and bust finished French style with points of black crape. Short full sleeve of black satin with three falls of black crape on the shoulder. Via Lady’s Monthly Museum ~ Dean & Mundy, Threadneedle Street, London, UK.

1818 December Morning and Evening Dresses, possibly for mourning as Princess Charlotte died in 1817. Published by Dean and Munday, Threadneedle Street, London, U.K.
1818 December Morning and Evening Dresses, possibly for mourning as Princess Charlotte died in 1817. Published by Dean and Munday, Threadneedle Street, London, U.K.

1818 December Morning and Evening Dresses, Possibly For Mourning. #RegencyEra #Fashion #Mourning https://books2read.com/SuziLoveFashionWomen1815-1819

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What was fashionable in Jane Austen’s times? Mourning, riding, daytime, evening fashions plus underclothing. #Regency #JaneAusten #Fashion

January 25, 2022

What was fashionable for women in Jane Austen’s times? Mourning, riding, daytime, evening clothing, plus underclothing, corsets and accessories. Fashion Women 1810-1814 History Notes Book 27 This book looks at what was fashionable for women in Jane Austen’s times, or the early 1800s, or the Regency Era in Britain. Wars were being fought around the globe so women’s fashion adopted a military look in support of soldiers. Fashions, like the lifestyle, became progressively more extravagant and accessories went from colorful to over-the-top. https://books2read.com/SuziLoveFashion1810-1814

The Lady’s Magazine said of the basis of women’s fashion that was popular for the first twenty years of the 1800s, ‘White is still the prevailing color for robes. For morning dresses, linen gowns, in large diamonds or squares, are fashionable. Indian muslins, plain or embroidered, are preferred to Florence and satins. The designs of embroidery for shawls are of infinite variety. Long gloves, which reach above the elbow, are not yet laid aside. Medallions are hung around the neck from crossed chains and some of these medallions are shaped like the bags, called ridicules. These reticules are of the lozenge or hexagon shape, with a small tassel at each angle. Reticules, or ridicules, are in lozenge or hexagon shapes with a small tassel at each angle. In capotes, or hats, and ribbands, the violet and dark green prevail over jonquil. Bracelets in hair, pear-shaped ear-rings, medallions on square plates, saltiers of colored stones, are still in fashion.’

Fashion Women 1810-1814 History Notes Book 27 This book looks at what was fashionable for women in Jane Austen's times, or the early 1800s, or the Regency Era in Britain. Wars were being fought around the globe so women's fashion adopted a military look in support of soldiers. Fashions, like the lifestyle, became progressively more extravagant and accessories went from colorful to over-the-top. https://books2read.com/SuziLoveFashion1810-1814
Fashion Women 1810-1814 History Notes Book 27 This book looks at what was fashionable for women in Jane Austen’s times, or the early 1800s, or the Regency Era in Britain. Wars were being fought around the globe so women’s fashion adopted a military look in support of soldiers. Fashions, like the lifestyle, became progressively more extravagant and accessories went from colorful to over-the-top. https://books2read.com/SuziLoveFashion1810-1814

What was fashionable in Jane Austen’s times? Mourning, riding, daytime, evening fashions plus corsets and underclothing. #Regency #JaneAusten #Fashion. https://books2read.com/SuziLoveFashion1810-1814

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The Duke Of Sherwyn to Lady Rebecca Jamison, “Did you say you’d already been shot? Before tonight?” #RegencyRomance #HistoricalRomance #Mystery

January 25, 2022

The Duke of Sherwyn to Lady Rebecca Jamison. “Did you just say you’ve been shot? Before tonight.” Lady Jamison to the Duke, “One life has already been lost because of me. My friend was killed. Her body discarded like a tattered rag doll.”

Becca, a mathematical genius, saves her family from ruin by investing in railway expansion, but when a greedy syndicate murders her friend in order to get Becca’s calculations she is forced to beg assistance from new Duke of Sherwyn, her old nemesis. Embracing Scandal, Book 1, Scandalous Siblings Series. By Suzi Love. Historical Romance with intrigue. https://books2read.com/suziloveES

 of Sherwyn to Lady Rebecca Jamison. "Did you just say you've been shot? Before tonight." Lady Jamison to the Duke, “One life has already been lost because of me. My friend was killed. Her body discarded like a tattered rag doll.”

The Duke Of Sherwyn to Lady Rebecca Jamison, “Did you say you’d already been shot? Before tonight?” #RegencyRomance #HistoricalRomance #Mystery https://books2read.com/suziloveES

Lady Jamison to Duke, “One life has already been lost because of me. My friend was killed.”  #RegencyRomance  #HistoricalRomance #Mystery
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Embracing Scandal By @suziLove Book 1 Scandalous Siblings. #HistoricalRomance Lady Jamison saves family from financial ruin by railway investing but when her friend is murdered, Becca begs assistance from new Duke of Sherwyn. https://books2read.com/suziloveES

What was music around world in Jane Austen’s times and past centuries? #JaneAusten #GeorgianEra #RegencyEra #VictorianEra

January 24, 2022

Music History Notes Books 6, 7, And 8 By Suzi Love.

Want to know about #Music around world in #Georgian #Regency #Victorian eras? Try Music History Notes Books 6, 7, 8 By @suzilove Musical instruments and music around the world through the 17th, 18th, and 19th Centuries. Pianos, pianofortes, harps, viols, violins, and many more.

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Want to know more about music in the 17th, 18th, and 19th Centuries. Pianos, pianofortes, harps, viols, violins, and many more. #Music #nonfiction books2read.com/suziloveMusicGeneralbooks2read.com/suziloveMusicPiano books2read.com/suziloveMusicViolins
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“There are few people whom I really love and still fewer of whom I think well.” Jane Austen ~ Pride and Prejudice (1813) #JaneAusten #Quote #Regency

January 24, 2022

  “There are few people whom I really love and still fewer of whom I think well.” Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813)

  “There are few people whom I really love and still fewer of whom I think well.” Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813)
  “There are few people whom I really love and still fewer of whom I think well.” Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813)

“There are few people whom I really love and still fewer of whom I think well.” Jane Austen ~ Pride and Prejudice (1813) #JaneAusten #Quote #Regency

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